Moving to the North of England

The North plays home to five National Parks, as well as miles of majestic coastlines. Pleasant towns nestle on the outskirts of lively cities. In short, there is a landscape to suit everyone. It should be too good to be true that property here costs a fraction of what it does in the South, but instead, it’s the icing on the cake. The North East and Yorkshire are two of the cheapest regions in England, and offer charm, charisma, and property bargains.

North East

Photo by PauldCocker – http://www.flickr.com/photos/pauldcocker/
The North East is the cheapest region in which to buy a property, the average sale being just over £99,000, compared to £209,000 in the South East. Although the Northumberland National Park should not be forgotten, it is the coast that really makes the region special. Below are two coastal towns with very different things to offer:

Tynemouth

If you want the benefits of living by the sea without giving up easy access to a bigger city, this could be for you. Tynemouth is a charming town just 25 minutes by Metro from Newcastle city centre. It benefits from interesting shops and the stunning ruins of a 7th century priory, perched above its sandy beaches.

Last year, the average flat in Tynemouth sold for 152,463. This is somewhat above the average £117,471 for its borough of North Tyneside. Therefore, if you’re willing to forgo bijoux shops and a National Trust property on your doorstep, there are even more savings to be made.

Amble

If you’re ready to get out of the city, there is no shortage of welcoming towns perched along the stunning North East coast. Just over 30 miles out of Newcastle is Amble, a little village representing real value for money. The sea is literally on your doorstep. Less than two miles up the road is picturesque Warkworth with its Medieval Castle. Venture less than 10 miles from home and you will find yourself in Alnick, famous for its gardens and its castle, used as a setting for the Harry Potter films.

Amble itself is ideal for fresh fish and coastal walks, or tamer strolls out along the pier. It was once dubbed ‘the friendliest port in England.’ Although this was in a ship-to-shore telegram from the 1930s, its message holds true today, and Amble is a welcoming place.

The average price for property in this town last year was £123,043.

Yorkshire

Yorkshire has inspired some of the greatest writers of this country. From ‘Dracula’ set in coastal Whitby, to Heathcliffe and Cathy pouring their hearts out on the Yorkshire Moors in ‘Wuthering Heights,’ there is plenty to fall in love with. Yorkshire excels at small, welcoming towns, those below being just two of many examples. If you’re considering moving or investing in the north, there are plenty of houses for sale in York that may suit your needs.

Brighouse

With a junction onto the M62, Birghouse has excellent commuter access to large cities such as Leeds and Hull, whilst offering all the benefits of small town life. The delights that the town has to offer include a half-timbered pub, a local art gallery and an enthusiastic brass band.

The average property sale in the last year was £130,860. Or, to make your money go even further, try neighbouring Rastrick, with an average of £117, 686.

Bolton-Upon-Dearne

Around the South Yorkshire commuter belt there are a number of charming villages. Sprotsborough and Barnburgh both offer delightful village life but coming in with averages of 151,399 and 149,615 respectively, they well outstrip the South Yorkshire average of 103,390. If you are willing to put yourself at driving distance from these villages, rather than in their hearts, you can save serious dosh and still have all the commuter benefits that they offer. Bolton-Upon-Dearne centres around a 14th century church with a few local shops and good commuter links in the form of a railway station and access to the A635. Its average price tag of £82,424 was below the county average.

This is just a fraction of what the North has to offer and if you start your property search up here, you’ll find yourself spoilt for choice and with cash to spare!

(Statistics taken from the Land Registry February 2012 figures True of April 2012).